The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

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The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

Giving thanks is out, getting deals is in… Since when?

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Though it is only a couple of weeks into November, the lights and colors of the Christmas season came out simultaneously with Halloween crafts and costumes.
Now not only are Thanksgiving decorations being pushed aside, but the entire meaning of the holiday is being completely overshadowed by consumerism.
The transition from November to December is one to bring out the best in people. November is a time to reflect on what we are thankful for while December focuses on giving to others.
Many have taken to the “30 days of thanks” status updates on Facebook in order to show support for the spirit of Thanksgiving, each day posting something to be thankful for.
But another trend is still abuzz that is far from reflecting the ideals of gratitude and giving listed in those Facebook posts.
Yet, shockingly, occurs just hours after Thanksgiving’s end.
Well, at least it used to. Black Friday looms like a dark cloud over the well-intentioned and good-spirited purpose of November, drawing people away from good memories and good food in order to save money on clothes, games, appliances and technology.
During last year’s Black Friday frenzy, businesses made $59.1 billion according to the National Retail Federation (NRF).
The number of people out shopping, the money made and the time dedicated to consuming rather than giving thanks all increased from the previous year.
And this year it looks to be even worse.
Kmart announced that it will open at 6 a.m. on Thanksgiving, which employees are angered about, but the business seems to think the revenue is worth the dissatisfaction.
Other popular stores such as Target, Best Buy and Walmart also opened their doors on Thanksgiving in the past, further taking away from the purpose of the day.
Worse yet, according to NRF about 79.6 percent of the millions of consumers who shopped on Black Friday last year did so for themselves instead of for gifts.
There goes the “spirit of giving” argument used to bail out of dish duty and hit the stores.
Something needs to be done to bring back the purpose of the Thanksgiving holiday season, which is not to get the newest flat screen TV at half price.
There is one main reason as to why these stores are opening on Thanksgiving day.
It is because they are convinced we will go out and spend more money.
So don’t. Stay at home with family and friends. If family isn’t close enough to visit for the long weekend, Skype them and then go to a buddy’s house and see what their family does.
Don’t go and spend three hours in line for items that will be on sale next month. Instead of coveting all the items the media tells us we need, let’s stay home and appreciate what we have.
In the meantime, spend that last two weeks leading up to Nov. 28 not obsessing over what door-buster deals are the best option.
Instead, try planning out how to make this year’s Thanksgiving more about actually giving thanks.

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Giving thanks is out, getting deals is in… Since when?