The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

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The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

Haunted Central Valley: real haunts for fearless locals

 

 

We may not consider California State University, Stanislaus, in the middle of the Central Valley, to be a particularly exciting location to write home about—but at least it’s not haunted. California State University, Channel Islands has been ranked among the top ten haunted universities in the country, and it’s no wonder; it was built on the grounds of a former mental hospital.
For those still looking for a good scare, however, there are locations in close proximity to CSU Stanislaus with questionable histories..
The Sierra Building in downtown Turlock, belonging to Coldwell Banker Endsley & Associates, has not always been a place of real estate expertise. In the early 1920s, the location belonged to the Lillian Collins Hospital, a small facility of only 40 rooms that could not keep up with the needs of a growing town and was thus abandoned. In 1994, the first floor of the building was completely renovated for its new tenants; however, the second floor remained in its original state and was used for annual haunted houses.
When dark shadows began to appear, and cool breezes were felt, the former hospital fell under scrutiny. The American Paranormal Investigators took many photographs capturing unexplained light and reported spikes in electro-magnetic field readings. An audio recording provided seconds of what sounded like a French lullaby said to be sung by nurses to ill-stricken newborns; a tale hidden behind the modern Endsley walls.
Still as daunting in appearance as the stories about it is the Byron Hot Springs Hotel, a few miles past the hills of Tracy, CA. This famous former resort for athletes and movie stars has been burned to the ground twice and reconstructed three times.
In over one hundred years of its original construction, the site has transformed from a glitzy getaway, to a military interrogation camp, to a Greek Orthodox Monastery and is now in private hands. Housing versatile history, the building stands as a shell of its final construction in 1913. There have been reports of a man wearing white rags and sounds of running, believed to be what remains of attempted escapes from the destructive fires.
Fred Speer, co-founder of Altamont Paranormal, said Byron Springs has been in his teams’ interest for years, but they have not been able to access it. The hotel can be seen only from a distance, as it is on private property, but sits in the middle of an open field in plain view and has been the basis of stories that cannot be quieted.
“In the past, before paranormal was publicized on TV, those experiencing a paranormal event were considered crazy or just seeking out attention,” Speer said. These experiences, though, are now more widely shared. He said, “Now, with paranormal being as mainstream as it is, more and more are coming forward sharing their experiences and asking for help without fear or judgement.”
Finley’s Bar and Grill on S. Airport Way in Manteca is one such story that has gathered fame through its feature segment on “My Ghost Story,” nationally broadcasted on the A&E Bio Channel. Owners Deborah and Mark Finley approved an investigation for paranormal presence after feeling unexplained company and after a few employees quit once they felt the same.
Hanging pots and pans have been suddenly dropped onto the floor, and audio recorders have captured voices. These happenings have been described by both employees and customers, as the business continues in operation.
CSU Stanislaus does not yet have documented reports of hauntings on campus… for now. Happy Halloween, Turlockers.

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Haunted Central Valley: real haunts for fearless locals