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The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

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The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

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Penumbra Calls for Youth to Submit Poetry, Fiction, and Art for their Fall Edition

Andrea+Wagner%2C+Editora+en+cargo%2C+sonrie+enfrente+de+la+imprenta+colecci%26%23243%3Bn+de+ediciones+de+Penumbra.+%28La+Senal%2F+Malina+Duran%29

Andrea Wagner, Editora en cargo, sonrie enfrente de la imprenta colección de ediciones de Penumbra. (La Senal/ Malina Duran)

In celebration of the fall season, Penumbra is hosting opening submissions for their youth edition: Autumnal Transitions. This edition will be geared towards artists and writers, ages 18 and under, and will be themed around autumn, the passing of time, and the transitions of life.  
Andrea Wagner, one of four Editor-In-Chiefs of the literary magazine explained, “We’re very interested in providing a platform for students in the area of Turlock or Stanislaus, to submit work and be able to have a publication in a journal. Especially one that is from a local college such as Stan State.” 
Penumbra is a journal of literature and art whose existence dates back to 1989 when it printed its first publication.
Interested students can access the submission form on Penumbra Online. More recently, this online platform has expanded to offer students, poets, writers, and artists of all backgrounds, experiences, and walks of life an opportunity to share their stories.
“We want to highlight different voices, the younger voices because sometimes they don’t feel like they have a place,” said Essence Saunders, another Editor-in-Chief.
Submissions are currently open, and close November 17th at 11:59 p.m.
“This is new for us,” Wagner said. We’re hoping this generates interest both in the community and shares the knowledge that we’re thinking of, providing this platform for them to take advantage of.” 
With consideration and care, Penumbra editors and their team are aware that art and other creative passions are essential in establishing identity. 
“We, as the senior editors, felt that it was important to have specific calls where people felt personally invited. People will then feel more welcomed,” Wagner said.
A 17-year-old student from Davis High School, Kimberly Correa, shared her experience with writing.
“Writing has impacted my life in such a positive way. Writing gave me the freedom to express my emotions in a healthy manner,” Correa said.
Correa expanded by discussing how writing has become a universal outlet for many.
“When given a prompt during therapy, I tried my best to go into as much depth as I possibly could. It would be hard, but in the end, I would re-read it and understand how beautiful pain can look when written down,” Correa said.
Writing helps students find catharsis by giving them an outlet for their emotions. By seizing the opportunity that Penumbra is providing for them, students can begin to feel empowered and inspired by one another, which can cultivate a more open and accepting community. 
Thirteen-year-old student Isabella Villanueva, from Creekside Middle School, shared her love for reading and writing. 
“I enjoy reading because it’s like watching a movie in your head,” Villanueva said, “Sometimes, after reading a book, I want to watch the movie but there isn’t a way that could be the same that represents the way I imagined it to be. It’s fun.” 
“Younger people are just as artistic, just as creative, and just as well versed as older people in a way that often gets overlooked. Penumbra lets them show off what they can do,” Saunders said.
The Penumbra editors encouraged younger people to consider submitting to Penumbra due to their need for young, authentic voices. These pivotal moments of transition that young people experience correlate to the ever-changing nature of fall. 
“It’s an amazing opportunity to see their name on a website from the English Department,” Wagner said.
The Penumbra team related to concerns that many writers have, such as being intimidated to share their work, but they wanted to reassure those considering submitting that this is how learning happens.
“It’s okay to rewrite things or change your mind,” Saunders said. “It’s okay to say, I can go somewhere else with this. Sometimes your brain gets stuck with an idea–especially when you’re younger and you don’t know how to move anywhere else. It gets easier as you get older.” 
Wagner opened up about her experience as a young writer. She reflected on when she was eighteen and was petrified by the idea of sharing works that were personal. She’s turned the page on that chapter of her life, and said that this has now become her favorite part of being a part of Penumbra.
“It can build the self-esteem of young poets and young artists who especially don’t have an environment that encourages artistry,” she said.

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Penumbra Calls for Youth to Submit Poetry, Fiction, and Art for their Fall Edition