The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

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The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

Let the music fill your soul

In my mind, jazz has always been the province of the grown-up. It lives in the same place as married folks without kids who drink wine and host parties with imported cheese plates. Not boring, necessarily; just not my scene.
Last week I got taken out to see the Ian Stambaugh Trio. I was a little uncomfortable as we entered the lounge–the room seemed filled with perfectly coiffed and manicured ladies wearing cardigans and drinking wine. I tried my best to hide my chipped metallic teal nail polish and quickly slipped into a booth where my day-glo floral jumper wouldn’t be noticed.
Once we were settled into a corner booth, we ordered some food and a couple of ales and I began to relax. There were a lot of men in sweaters and shoes that cost more than I make in a week, but I also spotted a few pairs of Chuck Taylors and Big Earl sitting in the corner. Earl Matthews is the promoter responsible for Blues and Brews (a new-ish concert series that featured the Ian Stambaugh Trio last Wednesday), and numerous other shows that I’ve thoroughly enjoyed. Dr. Blue and Bad Medicine played the series on the 20th, and The Groovenators are scheduled for the 27th. Suffice it to say I trust Big Earl’s taste, so I took a sip of beer and focused on the music.
It may just be me, but I had a hard time enjoying the music when I approached it directly. Usually, I let music enter my ears and then it hits my soul. This time, I noticed that I needed to engage in conversation and nosh a little before I realized that the music was hitting my soul first and my ears second. Not the all out drama of your usual college band, but a slower, more mellow kind of groove. In the midst of a week full of lengthy papers and all-night study sessions, this was a nice change of pace.
I found myself halting mid-sentence a number of times as the trio picked up the room’s energy and flew away with it. I know this is the part where I’m supposed to start discussing “climactic overtures” and “improvisational divergences,” but I don’t really know enough about jazz to throw around the jargon. Instead of pretending expertise, I will say that I enjoyed the show on a different level than I am used to and, if asked to go again, I’ll say yes. Only next time? I’ll wear something a little more grown-up.

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Let the music fill your soul