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The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

Faculty Mentor Program Looks to Build Bonds at Stan State

New+FMP+protege+Alexis+Ryan+poses+in+front+of+the+FMP+bulletin%2C+which+is+used+to+promote+the+program+to+the+campus+community.%26%23160%3B

New FMP protege Alexis Ryan poses in front of the FMP bulletin, which is used to promote the program to the campus community. 

At Stanislaus State, students are being given the opportunity to build long lasting relationships and having a deeper sense of belonging by joining the Faculty Mentor Program.
The Faculty Mentor Program, also known as FMP, is an opportunity for students and faculty to have one-on-one interaction outside of the classroom. Students seeking to participate in the program would become a protege. Each protege selects a participating faculty member at Stan State that they would like to develop a mentoring relationship with. 
“I’ve been in the Faculty Mentor Program for four years now and it’s been great,” said Madeline Avila (senior, History). “The program provides students and faculty to get to know each other on a personal level, it does not just have to be about school. You can talk to your mentor or protege about anything, most of the people I am closest to are those that I met through the program.”
Avila and other students say that the benefits of being a protege in the Faculty Mentor Program are endless. Establishing a connection with a faculty mentor in your field of study is incredibly important for many individuals. Other benefits include boosting one’s self esteem, providing advice and support, and teaches a code of behavior and values of responsibility, all attributing to an experience that will last you a lifetime. 
“I joined FMP as an office assistant as well as a protege because I saw that it was a program orientated in student and faculty connection, which is exactly what I needed,” said Ella Nielsen (senior, Cognitive Studies). “I was welcomed to the FMP office and felt happy here from the very first day.”
Esteban Castro (senior, Computer Science) is another protege in the Faculty Mentor Program. He gave a strong recommendation to the program.
“I recommend the program to both faculty and students. It’s amazing to see how well students are able to build meaningful connections with faculty and vice versa,” Castro said.
Castro added that the mentors in the program are always searching for ways to help students on campus.
 Mentors for the Faculty Mentor Program at Stan State are faculty that volunteer their services. The FMP mentors are specifically trained to meet the needs of Stan State students. This training includes the review and history of the program, team building, cultural awareness, understanding diversity, and interpersonal strategies for improved communication.
“Our faculty volunteer their time to provide mentorship to students that doesn’t always revolve around academics, but rather than real life experiences as you go through college,” explained Jason Pourtaverdi, lecturer for the Department of Criminal Justice and director of the FMP. “On paper we are a program, but in reality we are a family on this campus. If you want that sense of community, belonging, and providing then the FMP is the program for you.”
The Faculty Mentor Program at Stan State began in the spring semester of 1987 and was initiated under the administration of Associate Vice President and Dean of Students, Fred Edmonson alongside Dr. Fred Hilpert, Professor of Communication Studies. With allocated funds, the California State University’s Chancellor’s Office implemented the Faculty Mentor Program on eight campuses in January of 1987. The program was initially designed for first generation students, but as time has passed, the Faculty Mentor Program is now open to all students.
The program is currently celebrating its 35th year anniversary at Stan State. The program is expected to receive congressional recognition from Representative Josh Harder’s office, as well as recognition from the City of Turlock.
To celebrate, they are also inviting all students and faculty to join them in a Picnic Interaction. This Picnic Interaction will take place March 17 in the lawn of Stan State’s quad. The event will be from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. and will feature games, music, and of course a picnic. 
For more information on becoming a mentor or protege in the Faculty Mentor Program, visit https://www.csustan.edu/fmp. You can also visit the Faculty Mentor Program office in Bizzini Hall room B-107D or follow the program’s Instagram page at @stanstate_fmp.

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Faculty Mentor Program Looks to Build Bonds at Stan State