The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

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The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

The Student News Site of California State University, Stanislaus

Signal

Reality TV promotes sinful life

A major theme in reality television is to choose a specific group of people and reveal the most extreme examples of their lifestyle. Look at shows like “Jersey Shore,” “Bridezilla” and “Dance Moms.” Sure, we can get a few laughs, and even some strive to become like these reality stars, but at what point is enough enough?
The fine line of entertainment and disrespect in reality television has been crossed. The latest group of people that the media has chosen to pick on are those of faith-based religions.
Over the last few months, there have been countless commercials for shows like: “Sister Wives,” which demonstrates the practice of polygamy in the Mormon faith, “Breaking Amish,” where a few members of the Amish community decide to break out into the real world and most recently “Preacher’s Daughters,” which follows the lives of a pastor’s family that have unruly daughters.
For a world that is trying to break away from stereotypes, these shows focusing on members of certain religions are adding fuel to the flame.
Whether the show be about Mormonism or Christianity, the group of people they reflect is such a minute percentage of that population and not an accurate representation of the faiths.
I have been the daughter of a preacher since the day I was born. In no way have I wanted to become a porn star or have my parents made my boyfriends fill out an application to date me, like the show “Preacher’s Daughters” has portrayed.
I have lived a normal life, going through the same trials and tribulations as any other ordinary girl. Living with the title of a preacher’s daughter already causes more than enough speculation of my life, and to now have a TV show be broadcasted about how I supposedly act is frustrating.
This anger does not come from being in the targeted group. Attention needs to be brought to the mockery and belittlement that media makes of individuals who take on the difficult task of proclaiming their dedication to a certain faith.
Everyone should have the right to live their lives in whatever way they want, without it being scrutinized by the media.
Resorting to such extremist portrayals of American citizens’ lifestyles is offensive. The media needs to be original and come up with new ideas for reality television.
It’s okay to show the reality of what it is to be Buddhist, Mormon or Christian, but make the show reality and do not just focus on one unconventional family that negatively symbolizes beliefs of thousands of people.

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Reality TV promotes sinful life